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Cheap HotelsScotland

Cheap Hotel Deals Scotland. 3762 Hotels Available.

Aberdeenshire

Bordering Angus, Perth and Kinross to the south and Highland and Moray to the west, Aberdeenshire in Scotland is an area that is rich in history and offers diversity, beauty, excitement, and adventure, not to mention rich and colourful culture for visitors to enjoy. The origins of this area are prehistoric, and visitors will find plenty to explore here. There are many fascinating places and areas to explore in Aberdeenshire, with a range of places of interest to visit. Some of the places of interest within these boundaries include Balmoral Castle, Drum Castle, Causey Mounth, and Haddo House. There are plenty of hotels, eateries, and shopping opportunities to enjoy throughout Aberdeenshire.

Aberdeen is a city in Scotland with the third highest population, and is an attractive maritime city with a rich history and vibrant atmosphere. You will enjoy soaking up the unique charm and character of this diverse city as you explore, and you can take in the silvery grey granite buildings that have earned it the name of 'the silver city with the golden sands'. Enjoy the golden coastal areas of the city, and explore the many attractions and places of interest here. You can take in buildings such as the Town and County Bank building, the Music Hall, and the Town House. Some of the attractions in the area include the Aberdeen Maritime Museum, Provost Ross' House, and the Gordon Highlanders Museum.

Located on the edge of the Highlands in Aberdeenshire you will find the charming village of Aboyne, which lies around thirty miles from Aberdeen. The village has a population of fewer than two and a half thousand residents, and is a place that oozes charm and character. You will find facilities here such as shops, sporting facilities, and dining facilities, as well as plenty of natural beauty to explore. Take in the Highland Games in August, explore the rich history of the area, and take in places such as the nearby Balmoral Castle.

Situated on the River Dee in Aberdeenshire, the burgh of Ballater lies east of the Cairngorm Mountains. A wonderful destination for hiking enthusiasts, and a place filled with natural beauty and wonder, this is an excellent place for a retreat away from the hustle and bustle of big city life. The village is often visited by members of the Royal family, with the Royal residence of Balmoral nearby, and there is plenty of rich history to explore here. Enjoy outdoor activities amidst beautiful surroundings, take in Balmoral Castle and the stunning Cairngorms, and enjoy annual festivities and events such as the Ballater Walking Festival and Victoria Week.

The royal burgh of Inverurie lies around sixteen miles from Aberdeen, and is part of the Aberdeenshire area. Nestled in the Don Valley, the village on the Rivers Don and Ury. This is a pleasant and charming place, boasting serenity, beauty, and charm. Surrounded by green farmland and mountains, this is a place with a rich history to explore, and getting around is easy and convenient. Nearby places of interest include Castle Fraser and Pitmedden Garden.

The town of Peterhead in Aberdeenshire has a population of around eighteen thousand residents, and is a town filled with character. It is situated at the most eastern point in Mainland Scotland, and if often referred to as the Blue Toon. The town's history goes back several hundred years, so visitors will find plenty to explore here, as well as a range of facilities and amenities on offer. Take in the maritime history of the town, and enjoy the beautiful views from the harbours.

Angus

One of thirty two local government council areas in Scotland, Angus is bordered by a number of other areas, including Aberdeenshire and Dundee. Once known as Forfarshire, Angus has a rich history and is split into distinct areas, including the mountainous region of the Angus Glens, the hills and towns of the south and east, and the valleys of Strathmore. There is much to explore in this area, and plenty to see and do, including lots of natural beauty and fascinating history to explore. Some of the places of interest here include the Angus Folk Museum, Edzell Castle, and the House of Dun.

The small town of Monifieth is part of the Angus area, and lies on the East Coast of Scotland, merging with the City of Dundee. This is an ancient town with bags of rich history and character for visitors to enjoy. It is also a place where you can breathe in the fresh air, relax, and enjoy the surrounding natural beauty of the area. A number of attractions lie within easy reach of the town, and this includes Broughty Castle Museum, Barry Mill, and Monikie Country Park.

A former police burgh and a town of over ten thousand residents in the Angus area, Carnoustie is located at the mouth of Barry Burn, which is on the East Coast of Scotland. The fourth largest town in the area, the history of Carnoustie goes back to the late eighteenth century, when it was founded. Once a popular seaside resort, it is eleven miles from Dundee and has plenty to explore nearby. Popular amongst golfing enthusiasts, this is a pleasant place to come and relax, with beautiful golden sands and events such as the fun packed Carnoustie Gala Week. Some local place of interest include Barry Mill and Crombie Country Park.

Located on the North Bank of the River Tay in Scotland, Dundee is the fourth largest city in Scotland, and is a vibrant and exciting place with plenty to see and do. The history of the city goes back to the Iron Age, so there is plenty to explore here. You can soak up the diverse culture and unique character of the city, and you will find plenty of attractions and places of interest to keep you busy. With a population of over one hundred and forty thousand, this is a thriving and bustling city. Often referred to as the City of Discover, some of the local attractions that visitors can enjoy include the McManus Galleries, the Verdant Works, Discovery Point, and the Mills Observatory.

The administrative centre and county town of Angus in Scotland, Forfar is a royal burgh that is home to around thirteen and a half thousand residents. The market town for the farms of the Strathmore area of Angus, this pretty town has plenty to offer in terms of character, charm, history, and facilities. Explore more about the early history of the town, which includes Roman invasions, and sample the local Forfar bridie. Spend time at the Forfar Lochs Country Park, and take in nearby places such as the Angus Glens and Glamis Gastle.

With a population of around eleven thousand residents, Montrose in the Angus area of Scotland is a thriving and bustling coastal resort town boasting both exciting history and natural beauty. A great place to come and relax, you will find plenty to keep you busy when you visit this town. Take in the 220 foot steeple that dominates the skyline of the town, explore the fascinating architecture, and enjoy the picturesque beauty and greenery that can be found here. Known as the culture capital of the area, there is plenty of culture and history to enjoy here, and you can visit places such as the nearby House of Dun.

Argyllshire/Argyll and Bute

Located in western Scotland, Argyllshire was also often referred to as simply Argyll. However, in 1975 when Scottish counties were abolished the area became known as Argyll and Bute, which comprised most of Argyll and the Isle of Bute. This area is now filled with a range of fascinating towns and village to explore, and has everything from history and culture to natural beauty and attractions for visitors to enjoy. Some of the places of interest that can be found in Argyll and Bute include Fincharn Castle, Carrick Castle, Fingal's Cave, the Arrochar Alps, and Castle Stalker.

The historic village of Rhu is situated in Argyll and Bute on the east shore of the Gare Loch. Once home to wealthy merchants and shi owners, this is a village with a rich history and lot of unique character. This is a place that has become very popular amongst yachting enthusiasts, but is also a place with plenty of natural history. Within easy reach of the village you will find attractions such as Hill House and Geilston Garden.

The Scottish Highland village of Ballachulish refers to the area now known as North Ballachulish. This is an area that has become a popular place amongst tourists, and visitors can enjoy great scenery, surrounding beauty, peace, fun, and more. You will find that there is plenty of history here to enjoy, and you can enjoy trying the local sport of shinty. Local attractions include the Glencoe and North Lorn Folk Museum.

Situated in Argyll and Bute, Scotland, Campbeltown is an ancient burgh with roots that go back around eight thousand years. The village has a rich industrial history in fishing, as well as plenty of general history for visitors to explore. With around five thousand residents this is a place that boasts small town charm and character, where you can really get to know the locals and learn more about the local traditions. This is known as a whisky producing region, but also offers other attractions such as the local museum and the annual Mull of Kintyre Festival.

The beautiful resort town of Dunoon is in Argyll and Bute, Scotland. This is a charming town of around eight and a half thousand residents, and has plenty of charm and attractions to offer visitors. Situated on the Firth of Clyde, the town boasts some wonderful natural beauty for visitors to take in, and you will find plenty to see and do here. Attractions in the area include the Botanic Garden, the arboretum, and Castle Toward.

A charming, attractive, and typically Scottish town, Inveraray can be found in the Argyll and Bute area of Scotland. The town is situated on the shores of Loch Fyne, and is the ancestral home of the Duke of Argyll as well as the traditional county town of Argyll. This town is filled with history, so there is much for visitors to explore. You will find some fascinating architecture to visit, and there is plenty to explore here. Visit the museum at the Georgian Inverary Jail or take in the Argyll Folk Museum.

One of the islands in the Inner Hebrides the Isle of Mull is a vibrant and exciting place, with plenty for visitors to enjoy. The largest village on the island this is a beautiful place and provides the perfect setting for a relaxing yet exciting break. Enjoy the beautiful beaches and crystal clear waters, take in the forests and mountains, and take in the local wildlife.

The resort town of Oban in the Argyll and Bute area has a population of around eight thousand residents. This is a place that offers plenty of attractions and facilities for visitors to enjoy, and is always very busy in the tourist season. Nestled in the Firth of Lorn, this is a place that offers natural beauty and charm, and also boasts a beautiful horse-shoe shaped bay. There are many attractions to enjoy here, and this includes the Waterfront Centre, the Cathedral of St Columba, the Oban Distillery, Dunollie Castle, and many others.

Scotland's greatest natural harbour, Tarbert is located in Argyll and Bute, and is looked over by the castle of Robert the Bruce. This is a town that has a rich, long, maritime history. Still a thriving fishing port, the town has plenty of rich and fascinating history, and you can take in the history of the area through sites such as the ruins of Tarbert Castle. The town has a very small population so it is easy to get to know locals and learn more about the local traditions and lifestyle here.

Ayrshire

Enjoying attractive views from its location on the Firth of Clyde, the county of Ayrshire in Scotland is a registration county and is home to a wide range of villages and areas that boast unique charm and character. An agricultural county, this is a place where you can enjoy open spaces, natural beauty, fresh air, and more. You will find plenty of history to explore within this county, as well as culture, attractions, and a range of places of interest to explore. Turnberry Castle, which some think may have been the birthplace of Robert the Bruce, is located within this county.

Turnberry is a castle that is located within the boundaries of Ayrshire, and this is a richly historic place with strong links to Robert the Bruce, who spent his childhood there although it is not known whether he was actually born there. The castle of mostly surrounded by sea, and whilst there is not much of the original building intact now it is still a delight for visitors that want to soak up some fascinating history.

The town and port of Ayr is located on the Firth of Clyde in Ayrshire. A royal burgh until 1975, this town has around forty six and a half thousand residents and is next to the golfing town of Prestwick. This is a town where you can enjoy soaking up unique charm and character, but will also find an array of facilities, amenities, and places of interest to explore, both within the town and in neighbouring towns and villages. This is said to be the place here prominent Scots were invited by the English and then hung, and in revenge William Wallace set fire to barns where English soldiers were staying burning them to death.

Located in North Ayrshire, Irvine is a new town and enjoys a pleasant coastal location, where visitors can relax and unwind as well as enjoy the natural beauty and pleasant surroundings. This town of around thirty three thousand residents enjoys a rich and interesting history, and one of the most historic parts of the town is the pretty and fascinating harbour. Visit attractions such as the Scottish Maritime Museum when you come to the town, and enjoy immersing yourself in the local culture.

Situated in East Ayrshire, Kilmarnock has a population of around forty four thousand residents. This is the larges town in Ayrshire, and is a vibrant and exciting place to visit, with plenty of character and atmosphere. The River Irvine runs through the town, and visitors can enjoy pleasant views and surroundings. Some of the places of interest to explore here include the Burns Monument, Bank Street, the Kilmarnock Cross, Dean Castle, and the Kilmarnock War Memorial.

Largs is a seaside resort that is popular amongst tourists, and is situated in North Ayrshire on the Firth of Clyde. This exciting and popular town is large and vibrant, and visitor will find plenty to see and do, as well as many facilities, amenities, and places of interest. The town has strong historic links with the Vikings, so there is plenty to explore here. You can enjoy a range of annual festivities here to help you soak up some of the history and culture of the area. Places of interest in this town include the Vikingar Centre, Kelburn Castle, and the town museum.

Situated in South Ayrshire, Prestwick is a town that adjoins the large town of Ayr. There is an evolving airport in this town, and Prestwick has become well known for its golfing facilities, and is known as the home of open golf. With a rich history in aviation as well as a fascinating general history, this town offer plenty to explore. You can look forward to a range of amenities and facilities, and some of the place to visit here include the Rozelle House Galleries and the Bachelor's Club, which are within a few miles of the town.

Troon is a town that is situated in South Ayrshire, and its location on the Firth of Clyde means that visitors can look forward to pleasant views and a relaxing atmosphere. The population of the area is around fifteen thousand, and you can soak up the small town charm and character of the area. Known for the Royal Troon Golf Course, this is place that offers history and culture to explore, as well as beauty and relaxation. Visit nearby attractions such as the Scottish Maritime Museum whilst in the town.

Banffshire

The registration county of Banffshire in Scotland is a diverse area with a number of different towns and village to explore. Visitors to this county will find history and culture waiting to be explored, and a range of attractions is never far away. You can enjoy a range of amenities and facilities when you come here, and you can enjoy getting to know the local in the various areas of the county. You will find a number of historical ruins within the county, and there is plenty of rich history to explore here.

The small village of Craigellachie is situated by the Rivers Spey and Fiddich, and this charming village has a rich history for visitors to explore. You will find that the locals here are friendly and welcoming, and you can learn more about the various traditions and cultures by chatting to the locals. Some of the different attractions that are within easy reach of the village include Balvenie Castle, and the Glen Grant Distillery and Gardens.

Bordering Aberdeenshire and Highland, Moray in Scotland is a fascinating place with lost of rich history and culture to explore. You will find many different areas to visit within Moray, and some very attractive scenery and surroundings to drink in whilst you are here. This is a place where you can relax and enjoy some downtime, but also a place where you will always have plenty to see and do.

Caithness

A registration county in Scotland, Caithness is a historical county with lots to see, do, and explore. You will find it easy and convenient to get around the area, so you will find it easy to explore and make the most of your time here. You will be able to learn more about the rich history of the area from the landscapes, and you will find plenty of places of interest to explore within the county.

Situated on the east coast of Caithness, Lybster is a pleasant village that enables visitors to enjoy attractive views and unique character. You will find this a great place to relax, and you can look forward to getting to know some of the locals and exploring the history and culture within the village. Once a big fishing port, this village is within easy reach of attractions such as the Laidhay Croft Museum, which is just a few miles away.

Historically one of two Caithness burghs, Thurso is now part of the Highland council area of Scotland. This is a town with a lot of rich history, so there is plenty to explore. You can enjoy delving into the past as well as learning more about the local traditions and lifestyle in the area. You can enjoy the attractive views of Thurso Bay, and take in the River Thurso, which flows through the town and into the bay.

Dumbartonshire

Dumbartonshire in Scotland is often referred to as the County of Dumbarton and is now spelled Dunbartonshire. Visitors to this area will find a number of exciting places to visit and explore, and there is plenty of history and culture to soak up here. You will not be far from a wide range of places of interest when you come here, and you will find the locals in the different parts of Dunbartonshire to be welcoming and friendly.

The picturesque village of Arrochar can be found near the head of Loch Long. This village is surrounded by the mountains known as the Arrochar Alps, and whilst part of the village once lay in Dunbartonshire it is now actually wholly in Argyll and Bute. This is a nice place to come if you want to spend some time relaxing, soak up some history and culture, and take in the beautiful scenery and mountains.

The town of Clydebank is in West Dunbartonshire, and it is situated on the banks of the River Clyde. The town is filled with rich history and culture, so there is plenty for visitors to explore, but you will also find a range of amenities and facilities to enjoy here, such as the large shopping centre in the town. There are many different fascinating areas to explore within the town. Nearby attractions include the Clydebank Scottish Maritime Museum, Fossil Grove, and the Paisley Museum and Art Gallery.

Situated on the north bank of the River Clyde, the town of Dumbarton is in Dunbartonshire, and has a population of around twenty thousand residents. This town boasts plenty of rich history, so there is plenty to explore here, and you can also spend time soaking up the culture within the area. The town has a rich industrial history in glass making, ship building, and whisky production. You can also visit attractions such as the Denny Ship Model Experiment Tank, the Finlaystone Country Estate, and Geilston Garden.

Kirkintilloch is situated in East Dunbartonshire, and is just eight miles from Glasgow. The town has a population of around twenty thousand residents, and is filled with history, so there is a lot to explore here. Explore the history of the area, and take in the local culture and traditions. With Glasgow so close you can visit a wide range of attractions with ease from this town, such as Glasgow Cathedral, Provands Lordship, and Hutcheson's Hall.

Dumfries and Galloway

The council area of Dumfries and Galloway is bordered by South and East Ayrshire as well as South Lanarkshire. It is also bordered by the county of Cumbria in England. This is a pleasant area and is popularity amongst artsy types such as writers and artists. There are many diverse town and villages to explore here, and each offers its own unique history and culture. Spend time exploring the local sites of interest and attractions, and take in places such as Cardoness Castle, Glenluce Abbey, and Sweetheart Abbey.

The small village of Ecclefechan is in Dumfries and Galloway, and local simply call the village Fechan. The village has a very small population, and is a good place to get to know the locals and learn more about the area. Situated in the valley of the Mein Water, this village offers attractive surroundings, and there is plenty of history to explore within the area. There are a number of places of interest to explore, such as the Arched House, and the Roman fort, Burnswark.

The former Royal Burgh of Dumfries is located in Dumfries and Galloway, and the town has a population of around thirty one thousand residents. Founded in 1186, this is a town with plenty in the way of history to explore, and visitors will enjoy immersing themselves in the local culture and traditions of the area. The place where Robert Burns spent the last few years of his life, this is a place with plenty of sites of interest to explore. Some of the place to visit include the John Paul Jones Birthplace Museum, Sweetheart Abbey, and Drumlanrig Castle, all of which are within easy reach.

Often associated with runaway marriages, Gretna Green in the Dumfries and Galloway area of Scotland is a place that is close to the border of England, and is situated close to the mouth of the River Esk. The town is famed for its Blacksmith's shops, where many of the runaway marriages have been performed over the years. In fact, Gretna Green is not all about illicit marriages of teenagers who do not have parental consent, but is an attractive and charming place with lots of history and diverse culture to explore. There are a number of places of interest within easy reach, and this is a fascinating town to explore.

Lockerbie, in the Dumfries and Galloway area of Scotland, is often associated these days with the Lockerbie air disaster, after the crash of a commercial plane in 1988 due to terrorist bombs. However, despite this recent dark history this is a town that has a lot of history to explore and a range of places of interest. Known for its sheep auctions, the town offers plenty of facilities and amenities for visitors to enjoy, so you will find plenty to keep you busy and you can get around with ease due to the good road and transport links.

The charming spa town of Moffat is in the Dumfries and Galloway region of Scotland, and enjoys a pleasant located on the River Annan. The town has a small population of around two and a half thousand residents, and is a place that has lots of charm and unique character. Moffat became a popular spa town in the seventeenth century, and today remains popular amongst those looking to come and relax away from the stresses of the big city. Enjoy a stroll in the surrounding hills, or sip a drink at one of the cafes in the town.

Fife

The council area of Fife in Scotland lies between the Firth of Tay and the Firth of Forth. Commonly referred to as the Kingdom of Fife, there are plenty of different places to explore within this area, and you can enjoy soaking up history, culture, and attractive sites. There are many different town and villages to explore and visit within the area, so you will not be short of things to see and do. Amongst the places of interest that you will find within this area are the Fife Folk Museum, the Scottish Fisheries Museum, Falkland Palace, Dunfermline Abbey, and Kellie Castle.

A small village in Fife, Lundin Links is popular amongst golfing enthusiasts, with two impressive golf courses available. It is also a village that boasts natural beauty and a serene ambiance, making it ideal for those that want to kick back and relax. When you visit the village take in the historic standing stones that can be found here, and take time to explore the history and culture in the area. Within around seven miles of the village you will find attractions such as the Fife Folk Museum and Kellie Castle.

The village of Markinch is situated in Fife, and has a small population of around 2250 residents. This is a place where you can get to know some of the locals and learn more about the history and culture of the area, and there is plenty to explore within easy reach of the village. It is easy to get around the village and explore, and you will be able to enjoy a range of facilities and amenities here. Attractions such as Falkland Palace and the John McDouall Stuart Museum are within easy reach of the village.

Newburgh is a charming royal burgh in Fife, and has a small population of around two thousand residents. Located on the Firth of Tay, the town offers attractive views, and boasts a range of facilities and amenities. You will find various attractions and places of interest to explore here, such as the remains of Denmylne Castle and Lindores Abbey. You will also find plenty of history and culture to explore in this town.

A former new town situated in Fife, Glenrothes has a population of around thirty nine thousand residents. The town has plenty of culture for visitors to enjoy, and lots of artwork and sculptures to take in. You can enjoy good shopping facilities here, and getting around the town to explore is easy and convenient. There are also a number of places of interest to take in here, some of which include the River Leven Bridge, Raeburn Heights, and Fife House.

The town of St Andrews lies on the coast of Fife, and is the place where you will find the oldest university in Scotland, the University of St Andrews. With its rich and fascinating history, this town boasts plenty for visitors to explore, and it is also known as being the 'home of golf' making it popular amongst golfing enthusiasts. You can look forward to exploring the rich history of the area when you visit, and taking in some of the various sites of interest such as St Rule's Tower, the cathedral, and the castle.

Inverness-shire

Sometimes referred to as the county of Inverness, Inverness-shire was a county of Scotland until 1975. The county are has now been divided between the Highland region, and in general the area has lots of offer tourists and visitors, from natural beauty and great scenery to rich history, diverse culture, and plenty of sights and attractions. You can explore the variety of villages and towns in the area, and will be able to take in a range of places of interest and sights, with something to suit most tastes.

Aviemore is a popular tourist resort and town, and is situated within the beautiful Cairngorms National Park. Once located within the boundaries of Inverness-shire, it is now classed as part of the Highlands. This is an area that is popular with outdoor enthusiasts as well as with those that enjoy winter sports. You can enjoy some excellent walks here, and also activities such as skiing. Nearby attractions include the Strathspey Steam Railway and the Highland Wildlife Park.

A small village with lots of charm and character, Boat of Garten is also simply referred to as the Boat, and is an attractive place for visitors to enjoy. You will find a range of facilities here including a golf course designed by James Braid. Take in the RSPB Reserve at Loch Garten, or check out nearby attractions such as the Grantown Museum. You can look forward to a peaceful break away from the noise of the big cities when you visit this attractive village.

The settlement of Fort Augustus is situated to the west of Loch Ness. A busy and popular tourist area, the village boasts plenty of rich history and diverse culture for visitors to explore, as well as some areas of breathtaking natural beauty. You can enjoy chatting to the friendly locals in the area, and you will find a range of attractions and places of interest within easy reach. The village is easy to get around so you can explore to the full.

Fort William is the largest town in the Scottish Highland area, and has a population of around ten thousand residents. A very popular tourist destination, this is a place that boasts everything from rich history to natural beauty, making it the ideal place to explore and relax. You can enjoy a wide range of outdoor activities in the area, and you will find that there is plenty to keep you busy throughout your stay. Mountain biking is popular here, with an impressive mountain biking track available. A range of attractions within easy reach of the area means that you can enjoy a full itinerary as well as enjoying the opportunity to relax.

The capital of the Highlands, the city of Inverness is a vibrant and exciting one, with lots to see and do. Visitors here can enjoy plenty of facilities and amenities, and the city is surrounded by beautiful scenery. You will find lots of history and culture to explore within this city, and there are many attractions to take in such as the Inverness Museum and Art Gallery, the Cathedral of St Andrew, and the castle.

An ancient fishing port and fascinating town, Nairn, in the Highland area of Scotland, is a charming market town with a population of around eight and a half thousand residents. Popular as a seaside resort amongst tourists, the town offers a range of facilities and attractions, including two golf courses. The history of the area is rich and fascinating, and there is plenty to explore here. Some of the local attractions that you can enjoy include the Nairn Museum, Cawdor Castle, and Boath Doocot.

Newtonmore is a village of around one thousand residents, and is situated in the Highlands of Scotland. Just a few miles from the spot that it is claimed is the exact centre of Scotland, the village boasts beautiful views of the Spey Valley, and is in the Cairngorms National Park. You can enjoy a host of activities here, such as fishing, horse riding, and biking, and there is plenty to see and do. Take in local attractions such as the nearby Ruthven Barracks, and learn more about the traditions and culture of the area from the friendly and hospitable locals.

Kincardineshire

Sometimes referred to as The Mearns or the County of Kincardine, the area formerly known as Kincardineshire is located on the coast of northeast Scotland. The area is now part of the Aberdeenshire area, and visitors to the area will find lots of history and culture to take in. You can find many villages and towns to explore in this area, and there is a lot to see and do. Explore this history of the area, take in the sights, and immerse yourself in the local culture.

Banchory is one of the towns in this area, and is situated near to the confluence of the Feugh River and the River Dee. With a population of around six thousand residents this is a place that boasts small town charm and plenty of character, and visitors to the area will find plenty to explore here. Known as the Gateway to Royal Teeside, this town has become popular amongst tourists. You can take in the surrounding natural beauty of the countryside, and you can look forward to the opportunity to relax and unwind as well as to explore and have some fun.

Kinross-shire

Kinross-shire was once a county in Scotland, but after its abolition became part of the newly formed Perth and Kinross. The area boasts a lot of rich history, and is filled with charming towns and villages that visitors will enjoy exploring. You can look forward to immersing yourself in the local culture and traditions that can be found here, and there are many places of interest and attractions to take in here.

Kinross is a burgh that is located in the Perth and Kinross area of Scotland, in the part that was formerly known as Kinross-shire. A small town of around four thousand residents, Kinross is situated on the shores of Loch Leven, so visitors will be able to look forward to attractive views and surrounding natural beauty. Enjoy annual festivities such as the T in the Park Festival, and learn more about the traditions of the town from the friendly residents. Getting around the town is easy, and you will find a range of places of interest to explore within easy reach of the town.

Kirkcudbrightshire

Once a county in the south west of Scotland, Kirkcudbrightshire has now been absorbed into the Dumfries and Galloway region of the country. The area is bounded by a number of other counties as well as the Irish Sea, and is often referred to by locals as The Stewartry. The area is rich in history, so visitors here will find plenty to explore, and you will also be able to enjoy taking in the diverse culture as well as the range of sights and attractions within the towns and villages of the county.

One of the towns in the area is Kirkcudbright, and this town is situated at the mouth of the River Dee. With a population of around three and a half thousand residents, this place boasts small town charm, and visitors will be able to chat to the friendly locals and learn more about the culture and history of the area. There is plenty of history to explore within the town, and you will find a range of attractions and places of interest to take in, such as the Stewartry Museum, MacLellan's Castle, and the Tollbooth Arts Centre.

Lanarkshire

Now covered by a number of different council areas, Lanarkshire was historically a county of Scotland. The area that formed Lanarkshire has a range of towns and villages in its boundaries, and visitors will find plenty of places of interest and a lot of attractions to explore. This is an area that is rich in fascinating history, and visitors will be able to enjoy sights, attractions, natural beauty, culture and history when visiting the area. Take in some of the local events that take place here over the course of the year, and take time to explore the various places of interest.

A town of around thirty thousand residents, Bellshill is a vibrant and fascinating place, and visitors to the area will find plenty to see and do. The town has a rich history, and visitors here will find plenty to explore and get their teeth stuck into. The town has strong musical links, and there are many sights and places of interest within easy reach of the town. Some of the places that you can explore when you come to this town include the Motherwell Heritage Centre, Bothwell Castle, and the Summerlee Industrial Museum.

Scotland's second and largest city, Glasgow is a vibrant, exciting, diverse city, and has plenty to offer visitors. You will never be short of things to see and do within this city, and in addition to a range of attractions and sights you will also find plenty of rich and fascinating history to explore. Soak up the diverse culture in the area, and take in the sights, sounds, and smells of this exciting city. Each district of this city has something unique to offer in terms of sights and attractions. Some of the places that you can visit include the McLellan Galleries, the Gallery of Modern Art, Hutcheson's Hall, Provand's Lordship, the Lighthouse, Glasgow Cathedral, and many more.

A small town in central Scotland, Lanark boasts a population of over eight thousand residents, and was once the county town of the former county of Lanarkshire. This is a richly historic town, and you will find plenty here to explore. You can look forward to taking in natural beauty in the town, as well as plenty of places of interest and attractions. Soak up some of the diverse culture in the town, and take time to explore the sights. Some of the places of interest here include the Castlebank Park, Lanark Loch, and the Lanark Museum.

The small town of Strathaven is a Burgh of Barony, having been granted a Royal Charter in 1450. Situated on the edge of the valley of the Avon Water, this is a town that offers some impressive views and natural beauty. The town is a historic market town, and visitors will find plenty of fascinating history to explore here. You can take in the diverse and colourful culture of the area, and enjoy chatting to the friendly locals to learn more about the traditions of the town. You will find a range of attractions to enjoy when you visit, including the John Hastie Museum.

Midlothian

The county of Midlothian in Scotland is bordered with East Lothian, the City of Edinburgh, and the Scottish Borders. Until 1921 the area was officially known as the County of Edinburgh. This is an ancient area, and has plenty of rich history that is waiting to be explored. There are many towns and villages within the county, each of which has something unique and fascinating to offer visitors. Visitors to the area will also find many places of interest to explore, and some of these include Roslin Castle, Newbattle Abbey, and Wallace's Cave.

The stunning and exciting city of Edinburgh is the capital city of Scotland, and this is a diverse and fascinating place that is filled with culture, history, and attractions. Edinburgh has something for everyone to enjoy, and with so many things to see and do here you will never be bored. You can look forward to a full itinerary, and the city offers a host of facilities and amenities to ensure that your time here is memorable and enjoyable. You can get around with ease, so exploring the city will not prove to be a problem. Take in the historic buildings, soak up the culture, explore the city's rich heritage, and enjoy the many attractions, some of which include the Edinburgh City Arts Centre, the Nelson Monument, the Brass Rubbing Centre, the Museum of Childhood, the Edinburgh Dungeon, and much more.

Situated on the north bank of the River North Esk in Midlothian, the burgh of Penicuik has a history that dates back over two hundred years. The town has a population of nearly fifteen thousand residents, and is a place that has plenty of history and culture to soak up. The town has a rich industrial history in paper making, as well as plenty of general history to explore. You can enjoy visiting a number of local places of interest whilst in the area.

Orkney

Also known as the Orkney Islands, Orkney is an archipelago ten miles from the coast of Caithness in northern Scotland. Over seventy islands form Orkney, and of these twenty are inhabited. The area has a history that dates back over five and a half thousand years, so visitors will find that there is plenty of fascinating history to explore here. Spend time exploring the various places and sites of interest to learn more about the history of the area, and take in the beauty that surrounds the area. You will find over a thousand listed places of interest to explore here, and you can take in the striking natural beauty and even the Northern Lights in the autumn.

Peeblesshire

Once a county of Scotland, Peeblesshire was bordered by a number of other council areas, but ceased being a county in the mid-1970s. The area boasts some beautiful natural surroundings, so you can look forward to soaking up some striking scenery. There is plenty in the way of history to explore here, and you will be able to immerse yourself in the local culture and traditions of the area.

Peebles is a charming and attractive town situated on the banks of the River Tweed, and its hilly surroundings mean that visitors will be able to enjoy striking natural beauty and surroundings when visiting the area. This is a town that is popular amongst anglers and golfing enthusiasts, and is a great place to take a break away from the hassles of the big cities. You can take in annual festivities such as the Beltane Festival, and you will find a range of places of interest here such as Neidpath Castle, the Cross Kirk, and the Tweedale Museum and Gallery.

Perthshire

Situated in central Scotland, Perthshire is a registration county and is officially known as the County of Perth. Although Perthshire as a county was abolished in 1973, the area is a diverse and interesting one with lots of towns and villages that have been split between the central and Tayside regions. You will find plenty to explore in the area, including rich history and plenty of culture, and there are many sights and attractions that you can explore.

Kenmore is a town in Perth and Kinross, and is situated at the point where the Loch Tay flows into the River Tay. This is a town that offers plenty of natural beauty for visitors to enjoy, and you will find it a great place to relax and unwind away from the hassles of everyday life. The town has lots of fascinating history for visitors to explore, and you can enjoy immersing yourself in the local culture here. Local attractions include Taymouth Castle and the Scottish Crannog Centre.

The village of Kinloch Rannoch is situated in Perth and Kinross, and is situated by Loch Rannoch. Its location on the banks of the River Tummel makes this an attractive village with delightful surroundings for visitors to take in. There is a hill in the village that has been called the Sleeping Giant, and this is because it is said to resemble the head, shoulders, and torso of a man. You can enjoy a range of outdoor activities whilst staying in this charming village, and you will find plenty of time to kick back and relax here.

Blairgowrie is located in the Perth and Kinross area of Scotland, and is often referred to simply as Blair by locals in the area. Situated in the beautiful Strathmore Valley, this town lies by the River Ericht, and visitors will find some beautiful surroundings to take in whilst here. Enjoy learning more about the history of the town, soak up some of the local culture, and sample some of the delicious locally grown soft fruits. The population of the town is around eight thousand, and you will be able enjoy chatting to the friendly locals and learning more about this charming town.

Situated by the River Teith in Scotland, Callander a town that has become popular amongst tourists that are travelling to or from the Highlands. This town of fewer than three thousand residents boasts plenty of charm and character, as well as striking surroundings dominated by the Callander Crags. You can enjoy a range of local annual festivities here, such as the Callander Classic Weekend, and the Callander Jazz and Blues Festival. This pleasant town also offers a range of facilities and amenities for visitors to enjoy.

The small cathedral town of Dunblane in Scotland is a charming one with plenty of character. Its recent history has been marred by a massacre that took place in 1996, where sixteen children and their teacher were shot. The town does have a long history, and there is plenty to explore within easy reach. Places such as the Blair Drummond Safari and Adventure Park or the National Wallace Monument are within just a few miles of the town.

Dunkeld is a charming, small town situated in the Perth and Kinross area of Scotland. Visitors to the town will find plenty of rich and fascinating history to explore, and you will also be able to enjoy learning more about the local culture and traditions in the area. The history of the area is reflected in the appearance of the town, although visitors can still enjoy a range of facilities and amenities to ensure a pleasant and convenient stay. Some of the places of interest here include Dunkeld Cathedral.

The small village of Killin lies at the head of Loch Tay in Stirling, Scotland, and has a small population of fewer than seven hundred residents. This is a village that boasts incredible natural beauty, and visitors can take in the wonderful Falls of Dochart here. Killin has plenty of fascinating history to explore, and you will be able to char to the friendly locals to find out more about the culture of the area. Some of the nearby places of interest include Kinell House, Finlarig Castle, and Moirlanich Longhouse.

A town and former royal burgh in the Perth and Kinross region of Scotland, Perth is a vibrant and fascinating town with a population of around forth three and a half thousand residents. The history of Perth is long and rich, with plenty to explore and discover. You can look forward to soaking up some of the culture here as well, in addition to taking in the various sights and places of interest. Enjoy festivities and events such as the Perth Festival of Arts, and take in places such as the Perth Museum and Art Gallery, Scone Palace, and Balhousie Castle.

The burgh of Pitlochry is in Perth and Kinross, Scotland, and has a population of fewer than three and a half thousand residents. This Victorian town has bags of charm and character, and is a popular resort amongst tourists to the area. You can enjoy some fine scenery, and take part in a range of outdoor activities such as walking. Take in the mountainous landscape and explore the fascinating Victorian architecture. Every October you can take in the wonderful sound and light show, The Enchanted Forest.

Situated to the south west of Kinross lies the town of Powmill. Although Powmill is a small place, you will find the locals very friendly. Make sure you stop and have a drink in the Milk Bar.

Renfrewshire

One of Scotland's thirty two council areas, Renfrewshire borders Glasgow and is a place that has lots of rich history for visitors to delve into. There are many villages and towns that can be found within this county, and visitors will find something unique and fascinating to explore no matter which part of the county they visit. There are many attractions and places of interest to take in when you come to this county, and this includes places such as Castle Semple Loch, Paisley Abbey, and the Coats Observatory.

The village of Langbank lies on the banks of the River Clyde in Renfrewshire. This small village has plenty of charm and character for visitors to soak up, and you can enjoy spending time chatting to some of the friendly locals. A number of places of interest are in or near to the village, such as the Formakin Estate, Finlaystone House, Gleddoch House, and the Denny Ship Model Experiment Tank.

The commuter town of Erskine is situated in Renfrewshire, and has a population of around fifteen and a half thousand residents. Situated on he banks of the River Clyde, the town is not far from Glasgow Airport. The town offers good road and transport links, so you can get around and explore with ease. You will also find that there is plenty of history and culture to explore here. Some of the local places of interest within the town include the Erskine Bridge, Newshot Island Nature Reserve, and the nearby Paisley Museum and Art Gallery.

The burgh of Gourock has become a popular residential area over the years, although it was once also a popular seaside resort in Scotland. The town is one with plenty of history for visitors to explore, and you can enjoy delving into the past and learning more about the town when you come here. A number of places of interest can be found in this town, and some of these include the Kempock Stone, Gourock Park, and St John's Church.

Situated just six miles from Glasgow, Renfrew is traditionally the county town of Renfrewshire in Scotland. The town has a population of over twenty thousand residents, and enjoys a convenient location by the River Clyde and the River Cart. You will find plenty to explore in this former royal burgh, and can look forward to learning more about its past as well as about the local culture and traditions. You will find plenty of facilities and amenities to make your stay here all the more enjoyable, and you can visit places such as the Clydebuilt Scottish Maritime Museum and Fossil Grove, as well as the many attractions and sights in nearby Glasgow.

Ross-shire

A former county in Scotland, Ross-shire was bordered by a number of other counties. The area that was formerly known as Ross-shire is one in which there are many different towns and villages, with a number of places to explore. You will find that there is rich history to explore in all parts of this area, and you will never be too far away from local attractions and places of interest.

The village of Kyle of Lochalsh is situated on the northwest coast in Scotland, and is an ideal place from which to explore places such as the Isle of Skye. This is a beautiful village, and is a great place for those that want to relax, taking in the attractive surroundings, and enjoy a range of outdoor activities. The village is also known for the Kyle Railway, which offers a fascinating trip from Inverness to Kyle. The very small population of the village makes it ideal for those that want to get to know the locals and learn more about the area, and no matter what your reasons for visiting the village you can be sure of a memorable and enjoyable time.

The town of Dingwall is in the Highland area of Scotland, and has a population of just over five thousand residents. Once home to a castle that is known as the birthplace of Macbeth, this fascinating town has bags of history and character for visitors to soak up. Another castle, Tulloch Castle, lies on the outskirts of the town, and some parts of this date back to the twelfth century. You will find that chatting to the friendly locals here will enable you to learn more about the culture and traditions of the village, and getting around to explore is easy and convenient.

An attractive spa town in the Highland area of Scotland, Strathpeffer has a population of around one and a half thousand residents giving it unique small town charm and character. Nestled in a glen this town offers some beautiful views and surroundings, and visitors here will enjoy learning more about the history and culture of the area. There are two former battle sites situated around the area, and you will find plenty to explore here. Getting around to explore is easy, and you can enjoy a range of facilities and amenities to make your time here all the more special.

Tain is located in the Ross and Cromarty area of Highland in Scotland, and is a charming town with a population of around four thousand. Good road and transport links make it easy to get around, and visitors will find plenty of fascinating history to explore here. You will enjoy chatting to the friendly locals here, and can look forward to a host of facilities and amenities. There are a number of sites of interest to explore within the town, and this includes the Tain Through Time museum and the Glenmorangie Distillery.

A town of around thirteen hundred residents in Ross and Cromarty, Scotland, Ullapool has become a popular destination amongst tourists. Situated on the east shore of Loch Broom, this town offers some beautiful surrounding scenery, making it a great choice for those that want to relax amidst beautiful surroundings. With a history that goes back over two hundred years the town has plenty to offer those looking to delve into the past, as well as boasting fascinating and colourful culture. A number of events and festivities take place here over the course of the year, so you can really immerse yourself in the lifestyle and culture of the area.

Stirlingshire

Now split between a number of other council areas, Stirlingshire was a former county in Scotland, and one that offered diverse history and plenty of sites of interest. The area that was formerly known as Stirlingshire still has plenty to offer visitors, such as fascinating towns and villages to explore, rich history, diverse culture, and a range of attractions and places of interest to take in.

A beautiful and charming little town, Bridge of Allan is situated in the Stirling region of Scotland. You can enjoy exploring the main street in the town, where you will find a range of shops to browse, and you will find the local residents friendly and welcoming. Enjoy a drink at one of the cafes in the town, or sample the local fish and chips. The town has bags of charm and character to offer, and you will also find plenty of history to explore. Some of the local places of interest include the National Wallace Monument, Stirling Castle, and Argyll's Lodging.

Drymen is a village located to the west of the Campsie Fells in the Stirling region of Scotland. An attractive and charming village, this is a great place to relax and enjoy the surrounding natural beauty of the area. A popular stop for hikers in the area, the village offers a range of useful facilities and amenities. This village is home to the Clachlan pub, which claims to have links to Rob Roy as well as claiming to be the oldest pub in Scotland. Spend time learning more about the local traditions of the area, and take in some of the annual festivities such as the yearly agricultural show.

A large town of around thirty three thousand residents, Falkirk is a place that is steeped in rich history, making it an ideal choice of destination for those looking to delve into the past. The place where two major battles have taken place over the centuries, including the famous Battle of Falkirk where William Wallace was defeated by King Edward I, this is a place that has a great deal to explore in terms of its past. You will find a number of sites of interest in the town, and some of these include the Falkirk Wheel, Callendar House, and the remains of Antonine Wall.

The ancient city of Stirling surrounds a medieval old town and a large fortress. The population of the city is around forty one and a half thousand residents. This is a place with bags of rich history just waiting to be explored, and visitors will find plenty to see and do when visiting the area. Once a Stone Age settlement, Stirling has something for everyone, including history and culture seekers. Learn more about the famous battles that took place in and around the area, which are the Battle of Stirling Bridge and the Battle of Bannockburn. You can enjoy a variety of facilities and amenities here, and amongst the places of interest that you can take in are the Smith Art Gallery and Museum, Argyll's Lodging, and Stirling Castle.

West Lothian

One of the thirty two council areas of Scotland, West Lothian is bordered by the City of Edinburgh and the Scottish Borders amongst others. Created in 1996 this county has a range of villages and towns that visitors can enjoy exploring. The various parts of the county have history, culture, and a range of places of interest for visitors to take in, so no matter what part of the county you visit you should have plenty to explore and take in. Some of the places of interest within the county include Blackness Castle, Cairnpapple Hill, and Linlithgow Palace.

Bathgate is one of the major towns in West Lothian, and boasts a long and rich history for visitors to explore. The town offers good road and transport links, and this makes it ideal for those wanting to explore and make the most of their time here. Take time to learn about the fascinating past of the town, and immerse yourself in the local culture and traditions. Nearby places of interest include Livingston's Countryside and Beecraig's Country Park.

Situated in West Lothian, Scotland, Livingston is a New Town that was designated in 1962. The town is around fifteen miles from Edinburgh and around thirty miles from Glasgow. The largest town in the West Lothian area, Livingston boasts a population of around fifty five thousand residents. There is plenty for visitors to explore here, including many places and sites of interest. Explore the town centre, which lies to the south of the Almond Valley, and enjoy some retail therapy with a choice of shops. Getting around to explore is easy, and some of the places to visit include Livingston's Countryside and Almondell and Calderwood Country Park.

Wigtownshire

Often referred to as West Galloway in the past, Wigtownshire forms part of the Galloway region of Scotland along with Kirkcudbright. There are a number of major towns and smaller villages to explore within this area, and visitors will be able to take in a range of places of interest and attractions to keep them busy. You will find plenty of history to delve into within this area, and you can enjoy learning more about the colourful culture here.

Newton Stewart is a town situated by the River Cree, and is an attractive town with pleasant surroundings and plenty of amenities for visitors to enjoy. With around three and a half thousand residents, this is a place with plenty of character and small town charm, and you can enjoy getting to know some of the locals and learning more about the culture of the area. Known as the Gateway to the Galloway Hills, this is a place with plenty to explore and enjoy. Enjoy the nature trails of the Galloway Forest Park, visit the butterfly and tropical plant house, and explore the local museum.

The town of Stranraer is situated on the shores of Loch Ryan, enabling visitors to soak up some beautiful surroundings and views. This vibrant town has around eleven thousand residents, and visitors will find it easy to get around and explore. The administrative centre for the area, this town has plenty to offer visitors. Take in buildings such as the historic Castle of St John and Glenluce Abbey, or enjoy other attractions and places of interest including Ardwell Gardens, the Mull of Galloway, and the Stranraer Museum.

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